Superdry in Berlin introduces interactive smart mirror

Superdry in Berlin has introduced a smart mirror from design and innovation specialist Seymourpowell, which allows customers to browse through the brand's latest winter collection and interact with garments by trying them on 'digitally' before purchasing.

Seymourpowell collaborated closely with Superdry’s global merchandising and store design teams on the concept, which forms a focal point of the newly opened flagship store in the city; the brand’s largest store in the world at 3,800 sq m in the Neues Kranzler Eck in the heart of west Berlin.

'We’ve designed the Smart Mirror to stop shoppers in their tracks with an engaging, fun and highly interactive experience that brings them closer to the Superdry brand and products. A large full-length screen that acts like a mirror prompts customers to browse the collections using swiping gestures and select their favourites with an "air punch". Integrated body tracking technology allows them to try on the garments digitally as they browse. Any movement the customer makes is mirrored by the garment shown on screen, giving people a new, instant feel for how the product fits and moves,' says Pat Fahy, creative director, customer experience at Seymourpowell.

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As customers browse, additional information such as colour variants and design details for each garment is displayed, a new way of introducing the products to customers. Signage and messaging encourages customers to share their experiences of the Smart Mirror on social media platforms and data on which products customers ‘favourite’ and chose to try on is collected to help Superdry develop and tailor future collections. When not in use, the Smart Mirror becomes a dynamic part of the store design and merchandising scheme that showcases the new collection.

Craig Bunyan, senior designer at Seymourpowell, describes the innovative workflow used to turn the physical Superdry garments into interactive digital models: 'Using a combination of photogrammetry and 3D scanning techniques, we were able to generate high quality digital models, complete with photorealistic textures. These models were then bound to digital ‘skeletons’ which allow them to be driven by depth sensors embedded in mirror installation. The workflow is very similar to modern Hollywood CGI character animation techniques.'


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